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Mr Chairman, fellow Board members, members of the Human Variome Project Consortium.

Last November, the Human Variome Project held the first ever meeting of the International Confederation of Countries Advisory Council in my home city of Beijing. Representatives from all twelve HVP Country Nodes, as well as representatives from many human genetics societies, met to discuss one thing: how to get information on genetic variants and their effect on patients out of countries and into international databases so that global health can be improved.

It is a difficult problem, and it is a problem that we must solve together in order for the Human Variome Project to be judged a success. Our genome is the common thread that binds humanity. Information about our genome must therefore belong to all of humanity. There is no way to justify the retention of this information within national borders. No one country can discover all there is to know about our genome on their own. No one country has a large enough population to find anywhere near the total amount of variation possible. It is only by working together that we will know enough to make a difference to human health.

But this information does not exist in a vacuum. It must be generated. DNA must be sequenced, variants must be classified and phenotypes described. And it is an unfortunate reality that not every country has the technical or knowledge capacity to be able to do this routinely and effectively. Usually, as I’m sure we can all agree, diversity is a thing to be celebrated. But the huge diversity that is present in the world’s ability to provide adequate genetic healthcare is a problem and needs to be improved.

If we look to the mission of the Human Variome Project, it states that we are working to alleviate needless human suffering for many millions of the world’s people by facilitating the collection, curation, interpretation and sharing of data on genetic variation. This facilitation can come in many forms. Yes we are primarily concerned with producing standards and guidelines for databases. But the Human Variome Project has always recognised the need to assist researchers and healthcare professionals who are working to build capacity in their own countries.

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Media Release
For Immediate Release

Q1: Why is the Human Variome Project Meeting?

The Human Variome Project is an international consortium of scientists and health professionals working to improve global health through the free and open sharing of genetic variation information. Every two years the Consortium meets to discuss, debate and decode
on plans and priorities for the next two years.

These meetings have been occurring since the Human Variome Project was initiated in 2006. Since 2010, the meeting has been held at the headquarters of the United Nations Education, Scientific and Cultural Organisation in Paris, France.

Q2: What will happen at the meeting?

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Today is a sad day. Our colleague, collaborator, champion and friend, Professor David Rimoin, Inaugural Chair of our International Scientific Advisory Committee, passed away after a brief battle with pancreatic cancer.

David was a true friend of the Human Variome Project. Despite his many other commitments: Director of the Medical Genetics Institute and Steven Spielberg Family Chair in Pediatrics Cedars-Sinai, Professor of Pediatrics, Medicine, and Human Genetics at the David Geffen School of Medicine at the University of California, Los Angeles, David's support and work for the Human Variome Project was tireless. David's tenure as the first Chair of the Project's International Scientific Advisory Committee was incredibly productive. In this role he oversaw the establishment and growth of the Human Variome Project Consortium to include over 700 individual members, twelve HVP Country Nodes and 33 gene/disease specific databases. David was also particularly instrumental in starting discussions around establishing an HVP Country Node in the United States.

David will be sorely missed by every member of the Human Variome Project Consortium. His energy and enthusiasm for the Project, and for the field of medical genetics, was evident to all who were lucky enough to meet him. At our meetings, he was always a leading voice in every discussion. He will be missed, and our upcoming 4th biennial meeting in Paris in just a few short weeks, will not be the same without him.

Our thoughts are with David's family at this time.

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On February 29th, the entire Human Variome Project Consortium is commemorating Rare Disease Day—an international grassroots advocacy day to raise recognition of rare diseases as a global health challenge. We invite everyone around the world, to join with us and other groups within their own country in recognising both the challenge of rare diseases and the good work being done by millions of researchers, healthcare professionals, patients and their families and carers around the world.

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Media Release
For Immediate Release

Beijing, 13 December — The Human Variome Project Beijing Meeting wrapped up yesterday after five days of high level talks between members of the Human Variome Project Consortium and the Human Variome Project Chinese Node. The meeting focussed on encouraging new international collaborations that will enable the world’s genomic knowledge to be shared in a bid to improve global health. A particular focus of the meeting was how low- and middle-income countries can be supported.

The meeting also saw the official opening of the Human Variome Project Chinese Node, a multi-million dollar initiative of the Chinese Government to dramatically improve the country’s capacity in medical genetics, genetic diagnostics and genetic counselling. The Human Variome Project Chinese Node has also committed to undertaking 25% of the total effort required to complete the Human Variome Project, a figure in line with their contribution to the world’s population.

At the close of the meeting the Human Variome Project Consortium released a joint statement with the Human Variome Project Chinese Node, reaffirming their commitment to the free and open sharing of genetic disease in a manner that protects the privacy and dignity of patients and their families. The Human Variome Project next meets at UNESCO headquarters in Paris in June, at their fourth biennial meeting.

ENDS

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Posted by on in News

The Human Variome Project Beijing Meeting wrapped up yesterday after five days of high level talks between members of the Human Variome Project Consortium and the Human Variome Project Chinese Node.

The international Human Variome Project Consortium and the Human Variome Project Chinese Node

Recognising that our genes are fundamental to human life and diversity and are a common thread that binds all peoples and cultures,

Emphasising that the free and open sharing of information on genetic variations and their effects will improve human health by enabling faster, cheaper and more accurate diagnosis, therapy and treatment,

Recalling that Article 1 of the UNESCO Universal Declaration on the Human Genome and Human Rights states, “The human genome underlies the fundamental unity of all members of the human family, as well as the recognition of their inherent dignity and diversity,”

Noting that the mantra of the Human Variome Project is sharing data · reducing disease, and

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The international Human Variome Project Consortium and the Human Variome Project Chinese Node

Recognising that our genes are fundamental to human life and diversity and are a common thread that binds all peoples and cultures,

Emphasising that the free and open sharing of information on genetic variations and their effects will improve human health by enabling faster, cheaper and more accurate diagnosis, therapy and treatment,

Recalling that Article 1 of the UNESCO Universal Declaration on the Human Genome and Human Rights states, “The human genome underlies the fundamental unity of all members of the human family, as well as the recognition of their inherent dignity and diversity,”

Noting that the mantra of the Human Variome Project is sharing data · reducing disease, and

...

Media Release
For Immediate Release

Beijing, 9 December — The Human Variome Project Beijing Meeting was officially opened this morning at a ceremony involving many local dignitaries including former Ministers of Health and Science. The Human Variome Project Beijing Meeting is a joint meeting of the international Human Variome Project Consortium and the Human Variome Project Chinese Node. It will focus on increasing opportunities for collaboration between China and the international Human Variome Project, which is run out of Melbourne, Australia.

The meeting was addressed by Mr David Abraham, Chairman of the Board, Professor Xitao Li, Human Variome Project Chinese Node Director, Professor Richard Cotton, Human Variome Project Scientific Director, Mr Ramasamy Jayakumar, Programme Specialist at UNESCO, and, via video message, Professor Peter Doherty, Nobel Laureate and 1997 Australian of the Year. A welcome message from the Australian Foreign Minister, the Honourable Kevin Rudd, was also read.

Earlier this year, the Chinese Government committed US$300 million to meeting the goals of the Human Variome Project. This money will be spent to improve clinical genetics services in China and ensure that complete information on mutations in 5,000 genes from around the world is made freely and openly available. This meeting is the first step in this process that will take almost 10 years to complete.

The Human Variome Project Beijing Meeting will be a forum where with the support of China, the necessary international collaborations can be discussed, debated and formalised. It will continue to address the complex issues of how collaborative projects can be initiated and developed to produce positive clinical and research outcomes and allow the work to start. Meeting participants are drawn from the most prominent and representative experts in each of the relevant disciplines worldwide. The Human Variome Project Beijing Meeting aims to take the Project to the next level of international collaboration by specifically:

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The Human Variome Project Beijing Meeting was officially opened this morning at a ceremony involving many local dignitaries including former Ministers of Health and Science.